Posts Tagged ‘basing’

Rebased Terminators

Posted: February 25, 2011 in Diseased Sons, Squad, WIP
Tags: , , , ,

I would have liked to have had them finished two days ago, but I spent a lot of time waiting for paint to dry, for washes to dry, for glue to dry, for modeling paste to dry.  I’ve now rebased all my old terminators on 40mm round bases and can move on to painting new models.

All the Nurgle Terminators I rebased

A lot of steps went into getting them to look like this, including many, many, many hours spent painting the miniatures themselves. The Right Hard Posse was never designed as one big squad, it consists of a lot of extra models and was actually painted as some HQ choices and a couple small squads. Having put all these works into it over the years, I’m going to give the ten man squad a run at this year’s Astronomi-con Vancouver.

Fresh Sprue

Fresh Sprue

In order to get yet more bits to choose from I busted open two boxes of plastic GW models I’ve owned for years.  The Goblins weren’t any use, though I was surprised to find Wolf Rider parts and four banner bits in this box.  The Flagellants were useful.  This box is great for bits.  You get two of everything and lots of spare parts such as heads or little bits of chains.  The rest of the plastic, metal, and resin bits came from my bitz box and my mountain of sprue.

After gluing the bitz to the bases, I then busted out some modeling paste I had bought.  This wasn’t in the original plan, but some people sware by products like this as a basing material.  You can mix paint with it so it can be any color.  You can cut it after it dries, you can even add grit to it.  It goes on like icing a cake.  I used it to fill in the gaps between the big and small base, but perhaps I should have done this first and then stuck the plastic model bits into the paste, but it was a new product to me, and I never thought of that until it was too late.

Modeling Paste

Modeling Paste

After the paste dried, it looked a lot like snow bases, I’m sure some people have used it for that.  One benefit of gluing the bitz to the base is you can then sink them into the ground with paste or just sand and glue.  The white paste got a layer of watered down white glue then a dip into my box of beach sand and then another lengthy drying period.

Next came several coats of black paint.  The first was regular consistency, the next two were watered down.  I recommend gluing sand, and whatever else you plan to use as basing materials to the base during the model assembly phase.  That way if you use spray primer you don’t have to go through the repeated coats of black paint that I did.  Spray primer does a good job on sand.  This is one advantage I have over those paint the model in pieces or mounted on a handle people.

Drybrushing was next, the usual three GW manufactured brown paints.  I used a small drybrush, and was a bit heavy, but I’d never get every base to be perfectly the same or the sand to match that was old and with the new.  Especially because the old sand was really fine.  I like beach sand as it is irregular.

Terminators with modeling paste

Terminators with modeling paste

I started with the metallic bits.  They got painted chainmail, followed by two washes, one of Badaab Black and one of Devlan Mud. I also painted some brass bits using Tin Bitz and Brazen Brass.  I used a custom thinned Rust Brown Ink with some Plasma Red Ink for them.  I also painted the skulls Snake Bite Leather then Bleached Bone.  They two got the Rust Brown plus Plasma Red Ink wash.

After all that was dry the metal were done and the skulls looked pretty good, but I put a highlight of Vallejo Beige on them which looked two harsh so another custom wash was used, this time a darker brown mixed with red.  That was it for the skulls.  The various heads were painted Dhenab Stone then given a wash, of thinned down purple.  Then a highlight of Dhenab Stone.  Other bits were painted purple, or red, or brown.  I even tried out my English Uniform Brown that I ordered from the Vallejo range.

When all this was done it was time for rust and blood.  I did the rust first mixing up a custom wash consisting of water, rust brown ink, and Fiery Orange plus some left over half dried pigments that remain in my rust wash mixing spot…  For the blood I used Tamiya Clear Red and the Lonewolf Blood and Gore method or my interpretation of it.  This really gave the models I nice final touch and it was off to the photo booth.

Sand applied to bases

Sand applied to bases

The squad was pretty much too big to photograph at once.  It worked better as a squad of five models.  I also took some individual model shots all of which are up on Flickr.

Nurgle Terminator with backbanner

Now I’m at a cafe as it is so cold in Vancouver.  This weekend I’ll continue to look for a new job, but also start on some Lead Painter League entries.  I hope to finish one or two weeks worth before returning to models for my armies.

Old Chaos Terminator Updated

Advertisements

Well maybe not everyone but a lot of the miniature painting and hobby blogs I follow are making me look even lazier than I already am.  I thought after my last game, I’d get in some more games and get my hobby mojo going again, but it didn’t happen.  I still do a lot of thinking and planning, but not enough getting off my ass and doing.  In truth I have bigger problems than lack of hobby output, but I have so many cool ideas and so much money invested in this hobby, I really should try and do something.Nurgle Terminators on Bigger Bases

Either that or I should move up my excess hobby crap sell off date…

Anyway inspired by one of the coolest things I’ve seen in a long time, I resumed rebasing my Nurgle Terminators.  I kinda wish I had one more armed with Chainfist.  I could convert another one up, I have the parts, but I have enough models I need to paint and I think just making my one chainfist guy a champ will accomplish almost as much.

I’ve got them all on 40mm round bases now and I commenced gluing bits to them.  I raided my bits box and gluded on a bunch of 28mm metal skulls I got from Black Cat Bases.  It’s not all glamorous showpiece projects, sometimes you have to spend an evening with nail files and little metal skulls and various chemical concoctions.  I think six of them still need more bits so I will be busting out my bits still on a sprue, maybe even bust open of the many boxes I still have shrink wrapped for some fresh bits too. Some bases still need more bitz

Lots is going on in the hobby, the Lead Adventure Forum is running their Iron Painter or whatever contest.  The Iron refers to your ass or your will power as the goal is to paint 10 groups of five models over a ten week period.  You can get started early, as in right now.  Scale doesn’t matter, so I’d be better served painting small models not say Nurgle Terminators.  These models on my table right now won’t be eligible, they need to be in groups of five, not three, and rebasing doesn’t count as freshly painted, no matter how many little bits you glue on the bases.

Lead Painters League

I like to paint in groups of four sometimes even less.  I often paint one or two models just to add to a squad or to give me another option.  I’m going to have to alter my painting preference and re-order my queue.  I’m also going to have to dig into the many, many, models I own that are unpainted and find some that will score the odd bonus points.  First up is non-combatants.  I thought of some, I don’t know who manufactured them, or who traded them to me, but I have some dancing ladies that got thrown into a trade about 15 years ago.  They are definitely unarmed, in fact I think they are pretty much naked.  They are also smaller than 28mm so they will paint up quickly.

I will do up five Khorne Bezerkers though in reality I need to paint six…  One I think will remain unpainted until after the contest.  I will also paint up some Night Goblin Archers and a Big Boss for one of my units.  It is the basing that worries me there.  Normally I base the whole unit, in one go, that is 30+ Night Goblins in this case.  We’ll see how I feel, it takes a whole day to do the multi step basing process on that many models.

I’ll also be doing up some regular goblins armed with say a sword to serve as war machine crew.  Again I think I need six, so this time I’ll probably just do six.  I’m going to make custom movement trays for everything, so again basing these models will be way more work.

If I can get all that done in ten weeks I’ll be doing pretty good.  Might do up some Zombies or something for my Servants of Decay army.  Either that and go way off the wagon and buy something just for the contest, say the Fellowship of the Ring.

Wish me luck and stay tuned as I’ll try to update say weekly.

Remember how I talked about priming my old OOP Slaneesh Daemons grey?  Remember how I decided to test how this would work with the Grey Krylon Primer I bought?  Well their is a method to my madness, and no amount of purple text will make you smart.

Problems priming miniature

Problems priming miniature

Last night in between magnetic squares or something I primed the test Gretchin grey.  It did not go well.  I shook the can pretty good but all that came out of it in the first spray was vaguely yellow goop.  I wiped as much of that off the model as I could with my fingers and shook the spray can even more.  I tried spraying the Gretchin again and a big blob of grey primer comes out and lands right on the Gretchin’s face.

I shook the can even more rotated the model and finally got an almost acceptable spread of paint.

Lots of people have recommended this exact brand of grey primer.  It is used by professional artists, it is sold in high end fancy art stores, yet it is cheaper than GW primer.  Some claim GW’s isn’t even a primer just black spray paint which is probably true.

Bad Primer?

Bad Primer?

I was mildly annoyed at this development.  I was glad it didn’t happen to my OOP Daemons, but at the same time my test figure was seriously compromised.  So I got another 2nd Edition Warhammer 40,000 plastic gretchin out from their hiding place.  I cleaned the model, even drilled out the barrel for the nit picky.  I then primed it.  It went a little better.  I ended up rotating both models a bit and called them done after one more shot of Krylon Grey primer this morning.

I took photos naturally.

What do you do with the spots that aren’t primed?  When the model is black or white it seems obvious you fix the primer with that colour.  I don’t know if I have a grey that exactly matches Krylon Grey primer.  I have a lot of greys, maybe Foundation Astronomican Grey is close enough.  It should go on to bare metal and plastic OK…  I’m tempted to just use black though.  I’ve become something of a convert to basecoating models with Delta Ceramcoat black.  It is really matte, the Chaos Black is notably shinier.

The minis are salvageable

The minis are salvageable

One problem I did discover with the Delta Ceramcoat is it doesn’t stick to sheet styrene well.  Yet another thing in favour of using balsa wood.

I still got my great Goblin baseoff to do.  I’m expirementing with the basing material I have and contemplating biking to Strategies or Grand Prix Hobbies or both in search of some milder flock than that red stuff.  I tried using UHU glue just in spots, with a dip in the ballast then a sprinkling of red stuff.  I even got out two pairs of tweezers to try and minimize and position the red stuff.  I plan to give the static grass, which I’ve never used, the special leaves, which I’ve never used, and the lichen which I’ve barely used another go.  I think if I get a decent proportion of material the red will not dominate and people won’t complain that the ballast isn’t shaded…

It’s my damn army anyway.  I really do need to get a squad of Night Goblins finished.  It has only taken me 15+ years, they’ll be done by Saturday evening, all 55.  Well 58 including the fanatics.  I’m going to paint five fresh recruits, they are being primed Chaos Black right now.

The unit in their magnetized movement tray

The unit in their magnetized movement tray

Good morning sports fans.  I was up until quite late last night cutting little squares of magnetized material so that I could show off a completely built but not completely painted magnetized movement tray for a Horde of 54 Night Goblin Archers.  One of my discoveries late last night was I only had 50 Night Goblins in the unit, well 49 and a hero so I cleaned and prepared five more archers which I’ll paint this afternoon.

I’m up obscenely early bringing you the freshest miniature painting news from my painting table.

Making a magnetized movement tray isn’t any harder than making a non-magnetized one, but it does take time.  The most time consuming part especially for a Horde of 54 Night Goblins is cutting the small squares of magnetized material and affixing it to the bottom of each miniatures base.  You could use regimental bases to speed up the process, but I did 55 individual bases.  The hero was of course magnetized too.

Piece of balsa wood is too narrow

Piece of balsa wood is too narrow

The first thing you need to do is determine how large of a movement tray you need to make.  In GW land the most common base sizes are 20mm square and 25mm square, so the interior size is likely some multiple of those two numbers.  I’ve found they are sometimes a bit bigger when they have a miniature on them so it is good to leave a few millimetres wiggle room.  The movement tray was to be 11 goblins wide and 5 goblins deep.  I grabbed the piece of balsa wood I used for the Plaguebearers base and it was just a little too small.

Depth is close enough

Depth is close enough

You need to allow 3-4 mm depending on the material used for the edges.  I make my bases with three edges just like the ones GW sells.  Maybe four edges is better, I don’t know I’ve only made a few movement trays in my time.  I play mostly round base games where you deploy in dispersed formation not ranked up.

Measure twice and mark before cutting

Measure twice and mark before cutting

After cutting out the bottom of the tray it is important to check your measurements two or three times.  I used a metal straight edge and an exacto knife to cut the balsa wood.  Go slow and apply moderate pressure, eventually you may need to apply more pressure but by scoring it once or twice at low pressure you have a good groove to follow.

With the bottom ready it was time for the front and the sides.  I measured and cut the front first.  Then I use the front in measuring the sides.  I measure and cut one side then I make a twin.  When all three edge pieces are ready it is time to glue them to the bottom of the movement tray.  I used balsa wood for the sides as well, a little deeper piece than before about 3-4mm wide and about 5-6 high.  I wanted a deeper tray to accommodate the magnetic material.

Clamp and glue movement tray sides

Clamp and glue movement tray sides

Now you have to measure the inside space of your tray.  You only really need to measure the width.  Once you have your measurement transfer that measurement to the magnetic sheet.  I used a silver sharpie to mark the black magnetic material.  I again used a metal straight edge to cut the material.  I used a depth of 10cm for the other measurement, it overhung the wooden bottom by a couple millimetres but I figured it was worth it.

I used simple wood glue (Weldbond brand if it matters) to glue the magnetic material to the bottom of the tray.  Make sure you get the poles correct.  The other magnetic sheet I used had adhesive already on one side so it can only be applied one way so make sure the bottom of your tray isn’t repelling.  I then put something that weighed a kilo or two on the tray bottom and let it dry.

3mm extra space

3mm extra space

I was working on a number of different little projects at the same time, including how I was actually going to finish the bases of the model.  I have Autumnal materials which look alright but some of them I’m unfamiliar with.  Peabody wrote a tutorial on how he does his bases and I’ll be doing something similar.  I actually have the Matte Medium and plenty of pigment and ink, but I think I’ll just use white glue, that is how the test model was done.  I don’t want to make a mess of the entire unit.

Magnetized Night Goblin

Magnetized Night Goblin

Now after some drying time, which you really don’t have to wait for if you’re a keener, it is time to affix the magnetic material to the bases of the miniatures.  This is made really easy by the fact that I bought two types of magnetic sheets.  I bought both types at Urban Source on Main Street in Vancouver, but you could order the stuff off the internet I’m sure.  I carefully measure 20mm and then using the metal edge and the exacto knife cut out a long thin strip.  I actually needed four of them.  I could fit 15 bases on one strip.

It is actually pretty tough making a long perfectly straight cut with an exacto knife so in hindsight I might have been better off marking it with a pen and using scissors.

Once I had the strips I just grabbed a mini, put it on the white side, traced the edge and cut it with the exacto.  Eventually I switched to cutting the strips with scissors.  Once you have your little square just peel off the backing and put it on the bottom of the miniature.  It is better to have a little bit too much magnetic material than too little.  It cuts easy so once you have it on the bottom of the base you can use your exacto knife to trim it off, just like cleaning flash from a miniature.

Mostly magnetized unit

Mostly magnetized unit

Now since I’d let my glue dry on the movement tray, I could rank up my models as I magnetized them.  I did do the upside down test, all three plastic Night Goblins stayed affixed to the tray, even using less powerful magnets.  I never tried this test with my metal models in the unit nor did I tip the whole unit upside down.  The models stay put quite well and make it so it is easy to move the tray and the unit around.  Tipping your whole unit upside down and shaking it is just dumb.

Once I discovered I was a few goblins short of my desired unit size I got out some more Night Goblin archers that I got off eBay.  I cleaned them and magnetized their bases too.  Then I ranked them up, took a picture and went to bed.

Night Goblins from eBay

Night Goblins from eBay

See that wasn’t so hard, you can base the models however you want and use a little bit of basing material along the edge of the movement tray to help it blend in some more.  The models, even the metal ones, stay in place when you tip, tilt, and jostle the tray.  None of them tip over or fall out.  Yet you can pluck them out without any trouble as well.

Yet more basing materials

Yet more basing materials

Today I’ll be painting five more archers as I’d rather have one unit completely finished than borrow an archer from my other unit for the game on Sunday.  I’ll also be test basing another archer and my fanatics until I’m satisfied it looks as good as I can get it in the time allowed.  I dug out yet more basing material, including some fancy leaves I got off of Antenociti’s Workshop, they almost seem too nice to use on 15 year old, not terribly well painted, plastic goblins.  I’ve been stockpiling stuff for years and it is time see it on the table, so some of these leaves will find their way onto goblin bases, maybe just the front row, I painted them nicer too.

Autumn Test Goblin

That is the first test goblin base.  It was suggested I wash the ballast, I tried too washes, the ballast like cat litter is absorbent so it came out looking messy.  I don’t mind it as is, it is the weird red stuff that I bought so much of that doesn’t look too good to me.  It will be used judiciously, perhaps mixed in with some ballast or even some green flock.  I believe I still have some of the original green flock I bought over 15 years ago…

Beach Sand ready for paint

Beach Sand ready for paint

So although I got a very late start to the day, it appears at least one Golden Daemon winning or aspiring painter is following my blog.  I don’t really run in that circle, I’m not a bad painter, I can do better, but I paint my army or my toy soldiers to use in games.  People are often surprised I don’t enter more painting competitions, I just don’t need more stress in my life.  Painting 28mm miniatures can be stressful enough without flying to a contest and having them subjected to incredible scrutiny.  I just try to do the best I can, on the models I need to paint to play, in the time I have available.

What did I paint today upon learning that expert level miniature painters are paying attention to my little tips, techniques, and travails? I drybrushed sand! That’s right boring old beach sand, drybrushed a series of browns, that is what I needed to do to get the second movement tray finished for the Neatherworldly Mathematicians.  Since I knew I had to do this anyway I got out two entrenchments that have been off on the side of my painting desk for a month or more.  They needed some sand and drybrushing too.

Before Drybrushing

Before Drybrushing

After drybrushing sand, I painted wood and drybrushed that too.  Then I painted sandbags and drybrushed them as well.  I was running out of dry brushes. That is the thing about drybrushing, you really do need a dry brush.  I painted the other details on my hand built entrenchment and the green growth on the Snap Dragon one and called them done.  Not before I mixed up a custom rust wash and applied it to the metal plate and the pick axe.

More Basing Materials

More Basing Materials

Remember my other big goal for the week, basing 54 Night Goblins?  Well here is the material I bought years ago when I was considering strongly doing a Warhammer Ancients army.  Amazingly I’m tired of drybrushing mud, so I decided my next army, my first new army in decades, would be based with something other than drybrushed sand.  I opted for a fall scheme, now all I needed was to choose a brown.

The Chosen Brown

The Chosen Brown

When I started the Trench Table project I went to Deserres and stocked up on browns.  I picked four I liked best and upon inspecting the alsorans, I opted to use the one I labeled W2.  It is an in-stock Delta Ceramcoat Golden Brown.

Base looks like peanut butter

Base looks like peanut butter

Last night while not sleeping, I remember I had two spare Night Goblin archers painted in my miniature case in colour schemes I discarded years ago when I did up some greenskins to play Mordheim.  My greenskins were deemed such a success and so old school pressure was put on to paint the other 150 and have an army of them.  Now about 8 years later I’m very close to having a playable Warhammer 8th Edition army of goblins.  Loyal readers will know I opted to use Nurgle Daemons in the Mighty Empires campaign at Strategies as it was even less work getting them legal for 8th Edition, however in an unexpected campaign twist it is mandatory mercenaries week, so some of the Night Goblins must get based in time for Sunday’s game.

Base looks like crunchy peanut butter

Base looks like crunchy peanut butter

I tried the Golden Brown on the base of one of these unneeded but still painted Night Goblin archers, it looked like peanut butter.  I put the ballast on, it looked like crunchy peanut butter. I’m not sure I need any more jokes about this, impatiently I put some of this weird red flock, or what I thought was flock on.  It seems to be really fine foam-like material, you kinda have to squish it down with the end of a brush say to get it behave a bit more.  I wasn’t crazy over how it looked or the colour, but it certainly was different.

The final material I bought at Imperial Hobbies years ago, was lichen in Autumnal colours.  I reached for a tiny sprig of a non-red one and I thought it looked much better on the base than the weird red foamy stuff…  My plan is still to go ahead with basing the 54 Night Goblins and their movement tray I have to now make, peanut butter brown, add the crunchy bits and the some twigs of lichen.  Then after all that is dry add very little red stuff.  I also thought of mixing the red stuff and ballast together so I can apply it in one go…

One down, many to go...

One down, many to go...

That might just make a big headache, mess.  The finished model looks OK, hopefully it looks fine with my purple and blue flamed Night Goblins, the Nefarious Fire Tribe.  I’ve even named all the units now.  The one getting based is of course Ickybob’s Boyz still to come are the Prickly Posse and the Blue Bootie Brigade.  My ork unit which isn’t assembled or painted will be called Snaggletooth’s Snappers and will be lead by Ol’ Snaggletooth himself.  The Battle Standard Bearer and the Warboss who lead the other two goblin units might have had names last night while I couldn’t sleep, or perhaps they did not.

After dinner and a fresh round of applying for jobs, I’ll start work on making my custom magnetic movement tray for the 54 (55 with Hero) strong unit of Night Goblin archers, ranked up in five rows of 11.

Autumn Test Goblin

Test Models Inspect Entrenchments

Test Fit Steed

Test Fit Steed

Welcome back intrepid readers to another post on working with miniatures completely devoid of stylish purple text. After letting the glue dry on the multi-part OOP Daemon models and more importantly between the cork tile and the plastic GW cavalry base, it was time to finish off the base and securely mount the model.

The first thing I did was test fit the model and I got out a sharpie and traced roughly where the feet would go.  Then I looked in my toolbox for two part resin epoxy.  Finding none I decided rather than bike to Canadian Tire I would just use super glue to pin the model to the base.

Perhaps if the model was plastic this wouldn’t be necessary, but as this model was multi-part metal and was to serve as a Herald of Slaneesh in a Chaos Daemon Warhammer army, pinning the model to the base would be the wisest course of action.  I got out a piece of metal rod that I got in a whole bag from a hobby or craft store.  I got about dozen two feet long pieces in 1994 and I think I’m on the second one.  I estimated how long of a piece I need then got out heavier-dutier snips and voila a short ‘pin’.  I made sure it was long enough to go through the cork and the plastic by comparing it to the thickness of the base.

Measuring the pin

Measuring the pin

Next I used the pin vise to carefully drill into the rear foot of the Slaneesh Daemon.  I didn’t want to drill through the foot, which wasn’t exactly thick.  After a few minutes of patient twisting I had a hole of sufficient size.  I then used super glue to fix the metal pin to the model.  Then I place the model over the cork base and figured out approximately where I’d need to drill a hole in it.  Go slow with your drilling and this time you do want to go all the way through.

Glue the pin into the model

Glue the pin into the model

Using a judicious amount of super glue on the pin and both feet of the model I fixed the model firmly to the cork flooring material.  Then it was time for some more test fitting, I even decided the model deserved a head.  It also deserved ‘scenic scatter’ basically little bits and bobs to make the base unique.  I tried one of the big resin skulls, but in the end didn’t like it and went with a piece of an old 2nd Edition 40K box set Goff and another 28mm Black Cat Bases skull.

Drill through the base

Drill through the base

After they were secured to the model using Weldbond, it was time to thin some white glue and put it strategically on the base to secure beach sand.  This needs drying time, several hours, but when that has past shake off the excess glue and seal the entire cork and sand base with another layer of thinned down white glue.  This is apparently important.

Scenic ScatterThis was my first time using cork to fancy up a miniature base.  It wasn’t hard at all.  Remember to go slow, use solid basic techniques, measure twice, cut once, and when in doubt pin the model.

These Slaneesh Daemons are not a high priority in my painting queue, in fact I have to make some custom movement trays again and do yet more basing, this time 54 Night Goblins.  Oh boy! Eventually they will be primed grey as discussed previously, but first I may use a little green stuff to fill gaps in the multi-part metal model.  I’ll leave the ride unmounted until most of the way through the paint job.

Another test fit

Another test fit

Finish Base with Beach Sand

Finish Base with Beach Sand

Basing with cork

Basing with cork

Welcome back to the part of the Internet where random purple text and owning a domain called BloodOfKittens is not considered cool, where once again we will try to focus on the miniature painting hobby specifically how to give your minis that extra special base.  Hobbyists with Internet access and a credit card are spoiled these days with specialty pre-made resin base manufactures.  I’ve tried several and on my recent trip to Strategies Games and Hobbies on Main Street in Vancouver, I picked up some square bases covered in skulls manufactured by Micro Art Studio and Reaper Miniatures. I couldn’t find any cool cavalry bases (or 25mm by 50mm outside of GW land), so I was stuck with making one somehow.

Now I’d read online of the miracle basing product known to the rest of the world as cork tile.  Basically they are a form of flooring for homes, I found some excess thin cork at Urban Source, also on Main Street in Vancouver, which was 50 cents a piece.  You can use this cork to make bases, or rubble, or even buildings for your miniature wargaming needs.

Clamp and Glue parts together

Clamp and Glue parts together

First you need to cut out a piece of cork about the size of your base.  It can be a bit bigger on the front and the sides, but for ranking up not too big.  I don’t really plan to rank this model.  After you cut the basic shape you just randomly bust off, or pinch off, little bits of cork around the edges until you end up with an irregular shape, that fits basically on top of your plastic GW cavalry base.

Trim model tab

Trim model tab

Once you have a suitable shape, you get out your white glue, in my case Weldbond brand and you coat the cork with it on one side.  You then position the cork on top of the plastic base and clamp it tight.  Now you really need to give the glue time to dry, that is why I started with that part of my basing task.

Next I started cleaning up the bits and pieces that make up an old Chaos Sorcerer, an old Steed of Slaneesh with Daemonette rider, and an old Fiend of Slaneesh.  I used a file and in some cases an exacto knife.  The Steed did not have a tab, but may have had one originally, I got the model in a trade of sorts in about 1996, maybe be a bit after.  I filed down the feet so I’d have a nice flat surface to work with.  I test fit the legs and put weight on the back to see which position would be most solid.  Then I put super glue in the molded holes and glued both legs at once and let it sit.  It stands upright as you can see in some of the photos, this should make mounting it to the base easier.

Marking hole with white paint

Marking hole with white paint

After that I glued the rider together.  I twisted the upper torso around quite a bit, not to be dramatic, but because that was how the model fit together tightest.  You can do a certain amount of filing and adjusting, but sometimes you just have to go with whatever pose works best.  Finally I glued the lower jaw to the head and let the Steed sit on my hobby table in three separate pieces, four if you count the base.

The sorcerer was going to be the easiest, but still might provide a lesson in mounting models to resin bases.  That is right I’m using pre-cast skull bases that I bought in a blister.  I clipped off almost the entire tab on the sorcerer.  When mounting metal models to resin bases it is best to leave a small spike of metal jutting out from the bottom of the model.  I didn’t take the best photo at this stage but I was busying working away and all these pictures were just quick snaps with my iPhone.  After filing the the tab as level as possible I then test fit it on all five skull bases in the blister.  I found the one that seemed to work best with this model and I painted a dab of white paint on the metal spike.  Then I again test fit it, now there is a little glob of white paint on the base where the spike should go.  You then drill this out with your pin vise.

Adding plastic to the metal base

Adding plastic to the metal base

Then you test fit the model again and assuming all is well glue the bottom of the model and the spike to the base.

Setting aside the sorcerer I turned to perhaps the most problematic of the three models, the circa 1995 Marauder Fiend of Slaneesh.  I gave this model a good filing and test fit the various pieces.  The main torso is in two pieces and the base I bought for it is solid metal.  The first thing I did actually was trace out a 40mm by 40mm square of sheet styrene.  I scored it and broke it off like it says to do on the packaging.  Then I glued that to the bottom of the Reaper skull base which I’d also cleaned with a file and exacto knife.

If you use super glue like I did you only get one chance to do this.  If it is a little off you can just file and cut off the white styrene that sticks out.  Even before I opened the blister I’d decided to do this, I thought the model would slide better on the table and it added a little bit more height to the small Fiend of Slaneesh.  Turns out the base is partially hollow, I don’t think the sheet styrene was absolutely necessary, but I had it at hand and it does slide nice on my hobby table.

Hollow underside of metal base

Hollow underside of metal base

After basing the base I decided to trim off the tabs from the two halves of the Fiend torso.  I had already decided it was best to get the torso together before trying to base it.  I left a single spike on one leg and filed the rest flat.  It actually fit quite well on the base with three legs supporting it upright.  I’ve gotten ahead of myself, old multi-part metal models are often notoriously difficult to get a good fit.  This model wasn’t bad, I didn’t get out greenstuff, but I did file it a lot before and after I super glued it together.

With the model together and an optimal position on the base determined, it was time again for a dab of white glue and the pin vise.  I didn’t drill into the styrene, the base is plenty think enough to accommodate the spike.  Again I put super glue on all four paws and the spike and set it down on the base.  I held it together for 30 seconds or whatever then got out the arms.  I test fitted them and though the pose might not be the best, again I went with the tightest fit.  One arm fit better than the other so I did yet more filing.  At some point the model came partially unglued from the base, so more super glue to the rescue.

Fitting the Fiend together

Fitting the Fiend together

With the arms on the model, it was time for the head.  This had lots of surface to glue to, but not the best fit.  I may get out the green stuff for this, but I might just go with it.  It’ll likely never be an award winning model but I still think I can make it look cool.  I dubbed it “Retro Demon” and it will get a suitably disco paint job.

I flipped over the cork base and could still see white glue.  White glue, the brands I prefer anyway dries clear, that is how you know it has set.  So it was time for lunch and a blog post, not exactly in that order, but I’m getting hungrier as I type.  Later tonight I may finish off the cork base and the Steed of Slaneesh which is the most instructive half of this little project, then it is primer and back to brush work for me.  Though before that I may build a couple of movement trays and there is also 54 Night Goblins that need to have their bases finished.  They’ll get less elaborate bases to be sure.  I have a lot of work to do in order to play in the Warhammer 8th Edition Mighty Empires campaign.

Mid 90s Fiend of Slaneesh

Mid 90s Fiend of Slaneesh

Apparently one of the tutorials I’ve written has been added to the From the Warp tutorial section which I link to from my Painting Advice page but not in this blog’s sidebar.  I’ll have to fix that.  While looking for my name in lights so to speak and eating my sandwich, I discovered this tutorial on using cork in basing so you can see where I’m going.  I tried test fitting the Steed just now, it’ll work but I’m not sure whether pinning is necessary, I was going to and I think it is for the best…

Remember to let the glue dry

Remember to let the glue dry