Posts Tagged ‘Canadian Corps’

So three posts in one day, after five days of silence, what can I say other than I’m back baby!  Actually the last two postings could have been done as one, but I wasn’t sure I’d keep painting.  It is still hot in Vancouver and although it is almost midnight I really don’t have any reason to get up early now that the World Cup is over.

Continuing with my test model the next thing to paint on the Foundry Rifleman who will serve in the Van Doos eventually is the 08 Pattern Webbing.  This is famously canvas rather than leather which the first Canadians were shipped over to Europe issued with.  By 1916 all Canadian troops had 1908 pattern British webbing, my army is going to be circa mid 1916 so will have 08 Webbing, Lee-Enfields, and helmets. 08 Pattern Webbing Test Colours

For my first Foundry Triad test model I wasn’t satisfied with the Canvas colour (Triad #90), it tends towards green.  In the pictures and in the real example I’ve seen the canvas is yellow.  The other colour I ordered and tried was Drab as it was recommended somewhere, it is Triad #12 and has been ruled out for 08 Webbing.  While I’ve been painting terrain and other models I’ve tried out some GW and Vallejo colours.  For the Foundry Rifleman miniature I used Iyanden Darksun which if you can’t tell by the name is a GW Foundation paint.  I also tried Denab Stone on the Orlock.

Just the Foundry Rifleman modelThe secret though is the Gryphonne Sepia wash this is probably the most useful GW wash of the newest batch.  I use it to achieve a variety of effects, one thing I use it for is to “age” stuff, it also can darken and had a grittiness though if you use a lot of it the model will get a bit shiny.  What I should have done is possibly two basecoats of the Foundation paint then a Gryphonne Sepia wash, or Foundation base coat, wash, then Foundation again as the first highlights.  It all comes down to how much time you want to spend on your webbing.

What I did for the Foundry Rifleman test model was one coat of Iyanden Darksun, one layer of highlights of Vallejo Beige (Model Colour 917), and then a reasonable Gryphonne Sepia wash.  After that was dry I did some edge highlights of Vallejo Beige again.  I think I needed the two base coats of Denab stone and to delay using Beige and possibly GW’s Bleached Bone is a closer colour to use as a highlight, I gave the shirt and tabbard of the Orlock an extra wash and highlights with Bleached Bone, some people seem to paint their webbing more beige than yellow, we’ll see what the Lead Adventure Forum folks have to say, it looks yellow to me in prints, photos, and surviving examples.

It is 12:14 AM here Pacific Standard Time, timezones another Canadian invention, anyway it is also time for bed.  I’ll paint the weapons and the skin next as I’ve pretty much decided to give the Foundry Flesh Triad (#5) another go, possibly with a wash or an even lighter highlight from a GW flesh colour.  The Orlock as a test Servant of Decay will get a rather unnaturally unhealthy blue grey skin tone.

Hot weather isn’t good for painting, at least if you’re relatively poor and live in an old building…

Today was a little more productive and as it was Canada Day, perhaps my recent readings and research into the Canadian Corps was well timed.  Tonight I tried to finish the second modular trench tile.  Alas I did not make it.  I got most things painted but I need to finish off some fine details and paint the two big rocks. Drybrushed Dirt

I did finish the scatter terrain, even painted some sort of growth on one of the embankments.  I was originally not going to paint it green, just leave it brown but I looked at some of the other trench tables out there and they had greenery, though historically in the really heavily fought over sectors everything was just blown away into dirt and rubble.  There are some pretty hardy plants so I figured some sort of moss or fungus or algae could survive on the side of a trench so I painted it up to look like that.

I shouldn’t have started on the bed roll or rain sheet, whatever it is, I should have painted it after the rock, but I wanted to try and get a better canvas color, one that more closely matched the 08 Webbing used by the Canadian Corps and the BEF after about 1915.  My World War One army is going to be modeled as if it was early 1916 so they will have 08 webbing and Lee Enfield rifles, not that it is really a big deal at 28 mm, but it is the thought that counts. Test fitting scatter terrain

I also watched another of the supposedly best World War One movies, this one is called “The Grand Illusion” and it is another black and white film it is also another French language film.  It seems the French made more movies about WW1 than they did about the second world war.  It isn’t a bad film, shows the transition from wars fought by professional soldiers to wars fought with enlisted or even drafted men, men who weren’t career soldiers.  It does not have a single trench battle or any battles at all.  It takes place almost entirely indoors and the French soldiers spend the majority of the movie trying to escape.  It is like the Great Escape or Hogan’s Heroes in that regards.

I might order another book or here’s a thought try to get some from the library…  I also still need to find a job so maybe I should focus my reading to that end.

Mostly painted trench tile

I wasn’t very productive today.  I didn’t find a job.  I didn’t watch the World Cup.  I didn’t finish the second trench tile.  I didn’t even watch a film.  However I have worked on the trench tile.  I did watch “All Quiet on the Western Front” last night and I’ve been reviewing my other research material, principally two books. Maximum Grit

“The Canadian Corps in World War I”, is an Osprey title, perhaps the first one I bought.  It has a Van Doo on the cover and I pretty much will do a unit of them, how big of a unit I’m not sure.  Three officers and 116 enlisted men would be the best number.  The other book I bought is called “Postcards from the Trenches”, it is real postcards produced during the Great War that this collector ultimately donated to a museum and they produced the book.  It and the film reveal that my trenches may be too orderly, but other material shows it was all a matter of what sector the photos were taken in.  The Canadians or the Stormtroopers as the Germans dubbed them were always sent where the fighting was thickest Vimy, Ypres, the Somme.

As for modeling, after a coat of thinned down white glue dried, I then painted the tile black with a 1″ brush and Rustoleum brand black paint.  After that I twice went over the tile with a much smaller bush and Ceramcoat black.  Both times I used my ‘dab and jab’ technique as this keeps as much grit as possible in place and also is the only way to get paint into some gaps.  After even more black touchups, I painted the wood in the trench and just outside it Ceramcoat Terra Cota, which I thinned considerably with water.  Two coats was necessary for coverage but also tends towards orange… One coat of brown paint

Hopefully after the drybrush things look fine.  My two observations are it is better to leave a small gap between planks on the ground as it is easier to get the brush in there, requires less planks, and is more historically accurate.  The second observation is I don’t need quite as much grit inside the trenches.  Less grit but maybe more little detail bits.

I found two more interesting links while reading threads over a the Lead Adventure forum which along with B&C, The Waaagh, and the Miniatures Page is my go to place to discuss painting, converting, terrain, and mini manufacturers. Two coats of brown

The first link is an informative page with pictures about life in the trenches of World War One along the Western Front primarily.  The second link is to a new (to me) line of WW1 trench inserts.  These would be inserted into correctly cut shapes of foam, saving all the bother of doing the planking and sandbagging by hand.  They look pretty good, narrow, but big enough to accommodate 30mm bases apparently.  They are designed for 25/28 mm miniatures.  I may have to give them a go, at least their machine gun nests when I make version 2.0 of No Musk’s Land.

Tomorrow I’ll have to try harder to find a new job and it will be the drybrush fest as I will drybrush the planks, the sand and dirt, and the sandbags to match the first tile.